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What would a Trump re-election tell us about America in 2020? Updated: 2020-11-04 06:08:34 KST

Polls across America start to close,.. after voters cast their ballots to pick the next President of the United States.
It's the first time the country has held a presidential race amid a pandemic, and also the first time there has been such a massive early voting turnout.
More than 100 million voted before November 3rd by post or in-person. That's nearly 75 percent of the 2016 electorate.
The overall turnout is expected to be unprecedented but for the dust to settle, it may take days or, as some experts warn, weeks as all the ballots will not be counted on election night.
As we wait to get an inkling of who might emerge as the winner, we connect with Mica Soellner, Breaking News Reporter at the Washington Examiner in D.C.
We're also joined by Mark Shanahan, Professor and Head of Department for Politics & International Relations at the University of Reading who edited the book The Trump Presidency.

1. Mica: It was America's first presidential election to be held amid a pandemic. Could you paint us a picture of what it looked like at voting stations? (Was there a big turnout, long queues, COVID prevention measures, and etc.)

2. Mica: More than 100 million Americans voted early by post, making up over 75 percent of the 2016 electorate. The rest went to the ballots on Tuesday, where a huge turnout of Republicans was expected to offset the Democrats' early voting advantage. How do you expect the total turnout to be, as polls start to close across the U.S., and how long do you think we'll have to wait for early signs of the likely winner?

3. Mark: Polls in the last election were wrong. But Joe Biden has led consistently throughout the campaign and the massive early voting turnout might indicate that maybe Republicans won't see votes ticking up so significantly. With the unprecedented number of early voters, do Democrats have a clear advantage?

4. Mica: What do the odds look like right now does it seem the polls will be right? If they're wrong, should they just pack up and call it a day?

5. Mark: Upon the outcome of the 2016 election, we learned about the unique demographics that backed President Trump. They were inclined to oppose immigrants, imports and felt marginalized by the elitist ideals of modern U.S. society. If Trump is re-elected, what will we learn about American society, this time around?

6. Mica: President Trump has encouraged his supporters to observe voting stations for fraud and irregularity, and there have been concerns that there might be voter suppression or violence on the day of the election. Have there been such incidents, and are authorities bracing themselves for violence or a riot happening once the results are out, especially as Trump has threatened he may not accept the outcome?

7. Mark: The senate race has also been fierce. There are 35 seats up for election in the Senate, and the Democrats need to win four seats to gain a majority and three seats if Biden wins. Are the Democrats in with a good chance of gaining control of the chamber, and what would the outcome of the senate race mean for the next U.S. President?

8. Mark: Of course, this election is being observed all around the world, and, even putting the pandemic aside, this may have been the most bizarre U.S. election we've seen, preceded by a bizarre presidency. What are America's traditional allies hoping to see after this election?

Hopefully, we'll see a clear winner emerge sooner rather than later.
That was Mica Soellner, Breaking News Reporter at the Washington Examiner in D.C.
We're also joined by Mark Shanahan, Professor and Head of Department for Politics & International Relations at the University of Reading. Thank you for your time.


Reporter : osy@arirang.com
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