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Europe reports half the world's COVID-19 infections over past week. Is it too late for lockdowns? Updated: 2020-10-19 06:28:52 KST

The number of new COVID-19 cases worldwide skyrocketed on Friday by more than 400-thousand, the most since the start of the pandemic.
Half of the new cases were from major European nations, where there have been an average of 140-thousand cases a day over the past week.
That's more than the number of daily cases from India, Brazil and the United States combined.
France has the highest daily average at more than 19-thousand, followed by the United Kingdom, Russia, Spain and the Netherlands.
As the continent deals with this sweeping second wave, European leaders are highly concerned to the point of canceling a leaders' summit in November.
Over the weekend, they began re-introducing lockdown measures across some of their biggest cities.
But how effective will they be?
Today we're joined by Mark Shanahan, Associate Professor and Head of Department for Politics & International Relations at the University of Reading. Good to see you.
We also connect with Dr. Marco Vinceti, Prof of Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Modena, and at Boston University School of Public Health. It's great to see you again.

1. All capitals of the UK are now under lockdown along with more than half of England, where you are banned from socialising with friends and family from other households even at home. But it seems many people are questioning the effectiveness of these measures. What do these Tier 2 restrictions entail and do you think they'll be effective?

2. Dr. Vinceti, as daily cases in Italy hit a new record 11,705 on Sunday, your Prime Minister announced new restrictions to contain the virus. What are the new measures in place and do you think they will be effective?


3. Dr. Shanahan: Why has it been so difficult to get the infection numbers and the death rate under control in the UK?


4. Dr. Vinceti: How far do you think lockdowns should go in countries like France and the United Kingdom, where numbers are spiraling out of control?

5. Dr. Vinceti: Europe isn't seeing an increase only in infection cases, but also an alarming rise of hospitalizations and ICU admissions. Why do you think this is the case?

6. Dr. Shanahan: Scientists and the Labour Party have called for a circuit breaker strategy. What would this entail and why won't the government listen to them? And how are these conflicting statements affecting compliance, and the level of public confidence in the government?

7. Dr. Vinceti: What are the major concerns health experts have regarding the second wave, especially as it's flu season right now?

8. Dr. Shanahan: How do you think the government should be handling the situation right now?

9. Dr. Vinceti: Most of us our pinning our hopes on a vaccine to end the pandemic, but have worries about access to the drug. Once a vaccine or an effective COVID-19 treatment is developed, how would or should they be distributed to the public?


This is where we'll have to wrap up the discussion today. That was Dr. Marco Vinceti, Prof of Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Modena, and at Boston University School of Public Health, and Mark Shanahan, Associate Professor and Head of Department for Politics & International Relations at the University of Reading.
Thank you for your insights.



Reporter : osy@arirang.com
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