Other Stories

Weird summer weather caused by climate change. Will climate crisis worsen after COVID-19? Updated: 2020-08-11 06:00:29 KST

Here in South Korea, we've seen heavier rain than usual, with the seasonal monsoon triggering floods and landslides which have killed 30 people and left 12 others missing in just over a week, and displacing 6-thousand people.
Some experts are pointing to climate change as one of the reasons for the intense downpours, and other extreme weather conditions currently hitting countries around the world.
They warn that if humans don't take fast enough action to reduce their carbon footprint, the consequences are likely to be more dire going forward.
To discuss this, I have joining me polar scientist Mark Serreze, Director of the National Snow and Ice Data Center and Professor of Geography at the University of Colorado Boulder.
We also have Jessica McCarthy, Assistant Professor of Geography at Miami University.

Dr. Serreze: We've been experiencing an abnormally heavy and protracted rainy season in South Korea. Other East Asian countries like China and Japan have also seen heavier rain this summer. What's the reasonand can we say a shift in the air pressure system has been influenced by climate change?

Dr. McCarthy: Do you agree that this extreme rain we've been enduring has been influenced by climate change?

Dr. McCarthy: Will climate change in the Arctic and Siberia continue bringing heavier rain and more hurricanes to some regions and scorching heat to others?

Dr. Serreze: You've seen the loss of ice caps first-hand. And it's happening quicker than you predicted. Does this surprise you and what does this tell us about rapid climate change in the Arctic?

Dr. Serreze: Bill Gates recently said climate change is more serious than COVID-19. As an expert, would you agree?

Dr. McCarthy: There are reports air pollution levels fell due to lockdowns during the pandemic. But is this enough to be optimistic about slowing down global warming to levels in line with the Paris Climate Agreement?

Dr. Serreze: What does the COVID-19 pandemic teach us about the way we should address and respond to climate issues? What should the new normal look like?

Dr. McCarthy: Same question to you. The notion of a new normal. What should it look like?

Dr. Serreeze: How can we promote more science-based policies and decision-making, instead of having science politicized and distorted?

This is where we have to wrap up the discussion. That was Mark Serreze, Professor of Geography at the University of Colorado Boulder and Jessica McCarthy, Assistant Professor of Geography at Miami University. Thank you for your insights



Reporter : osy@arirang.com
KOGL : Korea Open Government License
본 저작물 중 본문에 해당하는 뉴스 스크립트(텍스트)는 공공누리 제1유형-출처표시 조건에 따라 이용할 수 있습니다.
weather