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Participation of Korea's original creators key to success for Hollywood remakes

Updated: 2014-02-25 16:16:08 (KST)
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This lakeside path looks quite familiar.
It's a scene from the 2006 American romantic drama "Lake House," which was a remake of the Korean film "Siworae."
The publication rights of around 30 Korean films have been sold in Hollywood over the past 15 years, and some of them were remade, including classics like "Oldboy", "My Sassy Girl" and "The Uninvited."
Roy Lee, a well-known American film producer known for taking Asian films and remaking them for audiences in the United States says he was surprised by the production values and storylines in Korean movies.

"They were also original stories that I have never seen before done in English. So when I saw movies like "My Wife's a Gangster" or "The Lake House," I thought those are the movies I would want to see myself if they were in English."

The adaptations of Korean films, however, have yet to find widespread success in the U.S. market as Americanized versions often end up being drained of the weirdness that made them so popular in Korea.


"And industry sources say that writers and directors of original Korean contents should also participate in the remaking process in Hollywood to increase the chances of the new version being a success.

"I think they have to share their passion and also about the whole movie insight. So that they understand fully, then they recreate not remake."

And it's not just Korean films that are being eyed by Hollywood producers.
Korean TV series are also getting attention.
Nine have already been picked up by Fake Empire Productions, the company behind a number of hit shows like "Gossip Girl" and "The O.C."

"Hollywood definitely looks to Korea as like a trendsetter in Asia because a lot of the TV shows and movies that are popular in Korea are also popular in Japan and China."

Roy Lee adds that as long as the Korean movie industry continues to take chances with new contents, it will have a marketplace worldwide.
Hwang Ji-hye, Arirang News, Los Angeles.


Reporter : emilyfwang@arirang.co.kr

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johnfelix1 (USA) 2014-02-26    

When I was teacher of children in an international school in Mexico, I showed them a Korean film. (I forgot the name of it. The plot was about a city boy who had to live with his grandmother in a rural area.) It seemed that they liked it a lot.