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Brutal wartime experiments by Japanese Navy, med schools revealed

Updated: 2014-01-23 03:47:19 (KST)
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This is a confidential report by the Japanese Navy exposing medical experiments conducted during World War II on living people.
The report details an experiment on the absorption action of yperite, known as mustard gas, which rots human skin.


"This is a dissertation based on a medical experiment on living bodies to develop protective army clothing."

It is part of a trove of documents stored at Japan's National Diet Library and released by a Korean media outlet proving that Japanese Army and university medical schools conducted gruesome medical experiments on war prisoners and civilians while they were still alive.
It is the first evidence of such experiments having been conducted by institutions other than the infamous Japanese military Unit 731 in China.
The documents also reveal that medical departments at nine imperial universities in Japan during that time carried out similarly brutal medical experiments.


"Even after 1930, the cruel experiments continued at other Japanese universities. Unfortunately, Unit 731 wasn't the only one to conduct experiments on living people."

One of the most notorious cases of human experimentation involved eight members of a U.S. Air Force B-29 crew.
The experiment was conducted in 1945 from May to June at Kyushu University in Japan.
The American prisoners were subjected to vivisection and other gruesome experiments -- before being killed.
Professors and students from the university were later brought to trial on charges of wrongful removal of body parts and cannibalism.
None were convicted of war crimes.
The Japanese government has yet to comment on the revelation, and has thus far only ever acknowledged the existence of Unit 731, not the experiments it was reported to have conducted.
Sohn Jung-in, Arirang News.


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