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Economic Factors Behind Naro Rocket

Updated: 2012-11-30 00:00:00 (KST)
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The Naro is off the launch pad and scientists say they will perform detailed inspections this weekend of the component that led to the failure to launch the Naro on Thursday.

Just 17 minutes before blast off - scientists abruptly halted the launch when the Thurst Vector Control or TVC in the second stage of the rocket malfunctioned. The TVC is one of the main components that directly affects the direction of the rocket. Last month, the Naro launch was scrapped after the discovery that a Russian made rubber seal was broken. Previous two rocket launches failed in 2009 and 2010. All three first stage rockets of Naro were built by Russia's State Research and Production Space Center and South Korea built the second stage rockets.

Which begs the question, why is the South Korean government so determined for success[Interview : ] There are many leading economies around the world that have been in this business for many years, including Korea's neighbors, like China and Japan. So when you take this into account, Korea is playing catch-up."

And what are the advantages economically that come into play with a successful rocket launch[Interview : ] "Some of the short term benefits is what the launch could actually have on production on different related parts and industries. The long-term benefits could include the PR effect the Publicity effect letting the world know that korea has achieved this level of technology that could greatly help Korea's private sector business doing their own marketing and business oversees."

Korea's aerospace program began in 2002 out of a growing need for South Korea to deliver satellites of it's own into space.
A separate space program to develop a 10-ton thrust engine by 2016 is already in progress.
That engine will be the first step toward developing a 300-ton thrust engine that can carry a 1-and-a-half ton satellite into space by 2021.

The country has so far sent about 10 satellites into space, but all were launched from foreign soil, using foreign rockets.
Only 12 nations have successful launched a rocket into space from their own soil.
Korea will continue trying to become the 13th.
Kim Hyun-bin Arirang News


Reporter : hyunbin@arirang.co.kr

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